Bluebirds
Featured Products

Featured Products

No/No Tray Feeder (SKU: NONOUD00314)No/No Tray Feeder (SKU: NONOUD00314)All Metal wire mesh basket and tray, hugh capacity, holds over 2.5 lbs. of seeds. Drains to shunt away moisture from rain or snow. No assembly, easy to hang. Dispenses black oil sunflower seed or mixtures of sunflower seed, safflower seed and peanut pieces. Resists squirrel damage.

Shop for Blue Bird houses at prices to suit your pocketbook! Read below to learn where to place your blue bird house, the location is important!

Bluebirds are one of the most popular birds among bird enthusiasts. This bird was once as common as the American Robin. Sadly, Bluebird populations have been declining, due in part from nest competition with House Sparrows and European Starlings. Bluebirds can be found in rural gardens, orchards, and suburban gardens near open farmland. Their arrival in early spring is a sure sign that winter is on the way out.
Feeding Habits

Feeding Habits

When it comes to feeding, Blue Birds eat large amounts of insects.
Eighty percent of their diet comes from insects during spring and
summer. In addition to insects, these birds eat berries and fruits off
of small trees and shrubs. You may want to try placing dried fruit
and/or chopped peanut kernels on a platform type Bird Feeder.
There are other ways to lure these birds, the best of which is to offer
them mealworms in a tray feeder. These birds are very fond of
mealworms, and if they are presented alive, and in a tray feeder, there
is a possibility of success. They are inexpensive and last a long time
if kept in a refrigerator. To see our specially designed bluebird feeder
see BlueBird Feeder. They are also attracted to Bird Baths, particularly if the water is moving, and makes splashing noises that they can hear at some distance. You might want to try a Water Wiggler to
keep the water moving in your birdbath.  Whether it's a birdhouse,
mealworms, or water that attracts blue birds to a yard, the reward of
seeing these gorgeous birds up close is well worth the effort.
Nesting

Nesting

The fact that these birds are cavity nesters is what makes it an ideal candidate for a bird house. In fact, if there was ever a bird in need of our help in providing nest boxes, it is the Blue Bird. This bird readily makes use of correctly built birdhouses. One simple and inexpensive type we like can be found in our Bird Houses section. If you plan on putting up a nesting box, place it on a pole within 4-5 feet of the ground. This height will help discourage house sparrows, and make it easier for you to monitor. Keep a watch on your nesting box and remove nesting materials from house sparrows and starlings. It's a good idea to have multiple nesting boxes close to each other. That way if a sparrow does build a nest in one, the bluebirds can build their nest in another. It is very common for Bluebirds and Sparrows to nest next to each other. In 1978, the North American Bluebird Society was formed. This society and others, including private individuals, have begun placing nesting boxes all across the country. Still, more needs to be done. There are three types of bluebirds, the Eastern Bluebird, the Mountain Bluebird and the Western Bluebird. Information for these three types of Bluebirds is below.

Eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis)

Identification Tips: * Length: 5.5 inches * Thin bill * Most often seen in open habitats: agricultural areas, wood edges, et al * Southwestern United States birds are paler Adult male: * Bright blue upperparts * Orange-red throat, breast and sides * White belly and undertail coverts Female: * Blue wings and tail-duller than male * Gray crown and back * White eye ring * Brownish throat, breast and sides * White belly and undertail coverts Juvenile: * Blue wings and tail-duller than male * Gray crown and back * White eye ring * Spotted underparts Similar species: The Eastern Bluebird is most likely to be confused with other bluebirds. Male Western Bluebirds have blue throats while male Easterns have orange-red ones. Male Mountain Bluebirds lack any reddish coloration on their underparts. Females are more difficult to separate. Both Western and Mountain Bluebirds have gray throats and gray bellies while the Eastern Bluebird has a brownish throat and white belly. Length and wingspan from: Robbins, C.S., Bruun, B., Zim, H.S., (1966). Birds of North America. New York: Western Publishing Company, Inc.

Mountain bluebird (Sialia currucoides)

Identification Tips: * Length: 6 inches * Thin bill * Most often seen in open habitats Adult male: * Bright blue plumage; brightest on upperparts * Lacks any brown coloration Female: * Blue wings and tail-duller than male * Remainder of plumage gray * Eye ring Juvenile: * Blue wings and tail-duller than male * White eye ring * Spotted underparts Similar species: The Mountain Bluebird is most likely to be confused with other bluebirds. Male Mountain Bluebirds lack any reddish coloration on their underparts unlike Eastern and Western Bluebirds. Females are more difficult to separate. Eastern Bluebirds have a brownish throat and white belly while Mountain Bluebirds have gray throats and bellies. Western Bluebirds are browner on the breast than Mountain Bluebirds and have thicker bills. Male Mountain Bluebirds might be confused with other all blue birds like Indigo Buntings and Blue Grosbeaks but these birds have much thicker, conical bills. Length and wingspan from: Robbins, C.S., Bruun, B., Zim, H.S., (1966). Birds of North America. New York: Western Publishing Company, Inc.

Western bluebird (Sialia mexicana)

Identification Tips: * Length: 5.5 inches * Thin bill * Most often seen in open habitats: agricultural areas, wood edges, et al Adult male: * Bright blue upperparts and throat * Brownish patch on back * Orange-red breast and sides * Gray belly and undertail coverts Adult female: * Blue wings and tail-duller than male * Gray crown and back * Eye ring * Gray throat * Brownish wash to breast and sides * Gray belly and undertail coverts Juvenile: * Blue wings and tail-duller than male * White eye ring * Spotted underparts Similar species: The Western Bluebird is most likely to be confused with other bluebirds. Male Western Bluebirds have blue throats while male Easterns have orange-red ones. Male Mountain Bluebirds lack any reddish coloration on their underparts. Females are more difficult to separate. Western Bluebirds have gray throats and gray bellies while Eastern Bluebirds have a brownish throat and white belly. Western Bluebirds are browner on the breast than Mountain Bluebirds and have thicker bills. Length and wingspan from: Robbins, C.S., Bruun, B., Zim, H.S., (1966). Birds of North America. New York: Western Publishing Company, Inc.

Some General Bluebird Statistics
Migration Status: Short distance migrant
Breeding Habitat: Woodland
Nest Location: Mid-story/canopy nesting
Nest Type: Cavity Clutch
Size: 3-6
Length of Incubation: 12-18 days
Days to Fledge: 16-21 days
Number of Broods: 2-3
Diet: Primarily: * Insects Lesser Quantities of: * Fruit, peanut meal
Author: Gregory Gough USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center Clutch size, length of incubation, days to fledge and number of broods from: Ehrlich, P., Dobkin, D., and Wheye, D. (1988). The Birders Handbook: A Field Guide to the Natural History of North American Birds. New York: Simon and Schuster Inc.
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